The Bend Veterinary Clinic Logo and home page link
541-382-0741
divider image Click here to go to our home page Click here to go to our home page Click here to go to our about us page
Click here to go to our home page Click here to go to our services page
Click here to go to our home page Click here to go to our news & events page
Click here to go to our home page Click here to go to our contact us page
The Bend Veterinary Clinic Surgery banner image
divider bar image
Clinic Hours of Operation banner img 541-382-0741
divider bar image

Bend Veterinary Clinic - Surgeries, Laser Treatments and Post Care

Cat Cleft Palate Surgery image

Things to Think About before you choose surgery for your pet.

Why Perform a Pre-Surgical Blood Screen?
Blood tests help identify problems not detected during a physical examination.

If results are within normal ranges, we can proceed with confidence and minimal risk. If results are not within normal ranges we can alter the anesthetic procedure, or take other precautions to safeguard your pets health and reduce the risk of potential complications.

These tests provide baseline levels for your pet that become part of their medical records for future reference.

Why Pain Medication?
We know dogs and cats feel the pain of surgery, just as people do. The difference is that they instinctively hide their pain. The severity and nature of the surgical pain varies with each pet and the type of surgery, but if left untreated, surgical pain tends to be most severe during the 24 hours after surgery. It then diminishes as the surgical wounds heal over time.

Knowing this, we can make your pet the most comfortable by anticipating and treating the pain, instead of withholding treatment until you see the signs that your pet is in pain.

On the day of surgery your pet is typically given a pain injection which lasts 24 hours followed by oral medication for approximately 4 days.

Why Microchip Your Pet?
Collars and tags can fall off. Tattoos can be changed. However, a microchip is a safe and permanent form of identification that can never be altered. Each microchip is registered into a national database individually, so that in the event that your pet is lost and taken to an animal shelter anywhere in North America you should be contacted within 24 hours.

TYPES OF SURGERIES:

Mass Removal

A mass removal is the surgical removal of a growth or lump on the body. Some lumps are cancerous and some are not. In many cases, surgical removal and biopsy is the only way to distinguish between the two. Cancerous lumps must be removed. Non cancerous lumps may occasionally ulcerate and bleed, in which case they should also be removed.

Post-Surgical Care:
* It takes time for the effects of anesthesia to completely wear off. It is normal for your pet to experience slight lethargy the evening of surgery. However, on the night of surgery be sure your pet moves around several times to stimulate circulation, thirst, movement of bowels, and elimination of anesthetics from your pet’s body.  * Start slowly with food and water. Offer small amounts of water 20-30 minutes apart. If interested in food, feed only ¼ of your pet’s normal intake at a time. If your pet experiences any vomiting, take both food and water away until the next morning and start slowly. Feed a normal diet the next day.  * Restrict activity to on leash walks, no uncontrolled running or jumping for 10 days.   * Watch the incision site for redness, swelling, or drainage once daily for 7-10 days. If any abnormalities are seen, check with your veterinarian.   * An e-collar may be required to prevent licking or chewing on the incision.

Declaw

A declaw is the surgical removal of the nail and it’s adjacent bony tissue.

Post-Surgical Care:

* This is an overnight procedure. Plan on picking up your pet between noon-5pm the following day. * You may feed as normal. * Watch the incision sites for redness, swelling, or drainage once daily for 7-10 days. If any abnormalities are seen, check with your veterinarian. * Paper litter (“Yesterday’s News“) must be used for 7-10 days post-surgery. The litter is available at the time of check out or Purchase before pick-up.

NEUTER

Neutering (castration) of male animals is the surgical removal of the testicles. It is a routine veterinary procedure performed while under anesthesia.

Post-Surgical Care:
* It takes time for the effects of anesthesia to completely wear off. It is normal for your pet to experience slight lethargy the evening of surgery. However, on the night of surgery be sure your pet moves around several times to stimulate circulation, thirst, movement of bowels, and elimination of anesthetics from your pet’s body.

* Start slowly with food and water. Offer small amounts of water 20-30 minutes apart. If interested in food, feed only ¼ of your pet’s normal intake at a time. If your pet experiences any vomiting, take both food and water away until the next morning and start slowly. Feed a normal diet the next day.

* Restrict activity to on leash walks, no uncontrolled running or jumping for 10 days.

* Watch the incision site for redness, swelling, or drainage once daily for 7-10 days. If any abnormalities are seen, check with your veterinarian.

* An e-collar may be required to prevent licking or chewing on the incision.

To read more about neutering without traditional surgical methods, view our Zeuterin Sterilization page.

SPAY

Spaying (ovariohysterectomy) of female animals is the surgical removal of the reproductive organs (uterus and ovaries). It is a routine procedure performed while under anesthesia.

On the day of surgery your pet is typically given a pain injection which lasts 24 hours followed by oral medication for approximately 4 days.

Post-Surgical Care:
* It takes time for the effects of anesthesia to completely wear off. It is normal for your pet to experience slight lethargy the evening of surgery. However, on the night of surgery be sure your pet moves around several times to stimulate circulation, thirst, movement of bowels, and elimination of anesthetics from your pet’s body.

* Start slowly with food and water. Offer small amounts of water 20-30 minutes apart. If interested in food, feed only ¼ of your pet’s normal intake at a time. If your pet experiences any vomiting, take both food and water away until the next morning and start slowly. Feed a normal diet the next day.

* Restrict activity to on leash walks, no uncontrolled running or jumping for 10 days.

* Watch the incision site for redness, swelling, or drainage once daily for 7-10 days. If any abnormalities are seen, check with your veterinarian.

Laser Treatments & Therapy

Laser therapy is the only course of treatment that actually stimulates the body to heal from within. Non-thermal photons of light are administered to the body and absorbed by the injured cells. The cells are then stimulated and respond with a higher rate of metabolism. This results in increased circulation from the body, an anti-inflammatory reaction, relief from pain and an acceleration of the healing process.

What to expect during a Companion Laser Therapy treatment session for your companion?

Simply put, it provides relief. As the laser is administered, your pet will relax and enjoy, much like you, experiencing a good massage. The almost immediate relief of pain will allow your pet to be comfortable and any anxiety that your pet initially experienced will dissipate. Angry feline companions will start to purr and most of our canine companions will actually fall asleep during their therapy session.

Frequently, after therapy, the quote is heard: “Our young animal is back” or “she acts like a puppy again.” – Pain relief is provided in just a few minutes of therapy and that alone improves the quality of life for your best friend.

The Bend Veterinary Clinic is proud to offer Companion Laser Therapy treatments for your pets.

veterinary laser treatments for your pet image

 

Healthy Adventures Await Banner Img.  Click to go to our About Us webpage

Services

Dog Exams & Vaccinations
bottom_divider_img
Cat Exams & Vaccinations
bottom_divider_img
Exotic Pet Exam & Vaccinations
bottom_divider_img
Dental Cleaning
bottom_divider_img
Surgeriesbottom_divider_img
More Services

News & Events

Good Morning Central Oregon Interview
bottom_divider_img
Animal Balance Newsletter [PDF]
bottom_divider_img Watch Videos & Interviews
bottom_divider_img
Featured Article
bottom_divider_img
More News & Events

Pet Care Resources

Resources & Links
bottom_divider_img
Pet Facts
bottom_divider_img
Coupons & Rebates
bottom_divider_img
Prescription Medications
bottom_divider_img
Adoptions

Social Links & Blogs

Lost Dogs/21st Paradigm Blog
bottom_divider_img
Animal Balance Blog - Dominican Republic
bottom_divider_img
Global Wildlife Resources Blogbottom_divider_img
Facebook icon image


Ester Honey Foundation
Pet Poison Control Logo & Website Link
American Veterinary Medical Association Logo & Website Link
Humane Society Veterinary Medicine Association


© 2016 - Bend Veterinary Clinic, 360 N.E. Quimby Ave. Bend, Oregon 97701  
Site Map   Website designed and maintained by Content Solutions


Our Staff is powered by Strictly Organic Coffee.